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April 2019

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1

 

April Fools' Day

 

2

 

National Peanut Butter & Jelly Day

 

3

 
 
 

4

 

National Burrito Day [RECIPES]

 

5

 
 
 

6

 

National Tartan Day [BONUS: VENISON RECIPE]

 

7

 

National Beer Day

National Coffee Cake Day

 

8

 

National Empanada Day [RECIPES]

 

9

 
 
 

10

 

National Siblings Day

 

11

 

2019 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Frozen Four

National Pet Day

 

12

 

NATIONAL GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH DAY [Bonus Recipes Included]

 

13

 

Spring Wine Tasting

2019 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Championship

 

14

 

Palm Sunday

 

15

 

Tax Filing Deadline

 

16

 

Day of the Mushroom [BONUS: VEGAN RECIPES]

 

17

 
 
 

18

 

Annual Meeting

 

19

 

Passover [April 19 to April 27]

Good Friday

GARLIC DAY

 

20

 
 
 

21

 

Easter

 

22

 

EARTH DAY 2018

 

23

 
 
 

24

 
 
 

25

 
 
 

26

 
 
 

27

 

Arbor Day

 

28

 
 
 

29

 
 
 

30

 

International JAZZ Day

 
    

April 19, 2019

Passover [April 19 to April 27]

Passover or Peach (Pesah, Pesakh), is an important, biblically derived Jewish holiday. Jews celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in ancient Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the story of the Exodus as described in the Hebrew Bible, especially in the Book of Exodus, in which the Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. According to standard biblical chronology, this event would have taken place at about 1300 BCE (AM 2450).

Passover is a spring festival which during the existence of the Temple in Jerusalem was connected to the offering of the "first-fruits of the barley," barley being the first grain to ripen and to be harvested in the Land of Israel.

Passover commences on the 15th of the Hebrew month of Nisan and lasts for either seven days (in Israel and for Reform Jews and other progressive Jews around the world who adhere to the Biblical commandment) or eight days for Orthodox, Hasidic and most Conservative Jews (in the diaspora). In Judaism, a day commences at dusk and lasts until the following dusk, thus the first day of Passover only begins after dusk of the 14th of Nisan and ends at dusk of the 15th day of the month of Nisan. The rituals unique to the Passover celebrations commence with the Passover Seder when the 15th of Nisan has begun. In the Northern Hemisphere Passover takes place in spring as the Torah prescribes it: "in the month of [the] spring" (Exodus 23:15). It is one of the most widely observed Jewish holidays.

In the narrative of the Exodus, the Bible tells that God helped the Children of Israel escape from their slavery in Egypt by inflicting ten plagues upon the ancient Egyptians before the Pharaoh would release his Israelite slaves; the tenth and worst of the plagues was the death of the Egyptian first-born.

The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a slaughtered spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass over the first-born in these homes, hence the English name of the holiday.

When the Pharaoh freed the Israelites, it is said that they left in such a hurry that they could not wait for bread dough to rise (leaven). In commemoration, for the duration of Passover no leavened bread is eaten, for which reason Passover was called the feast of unleavened bread in the Torah or Old Testament. Thus matzo (flat unleavened bread) is eaten during Passover and it is a tradition of the holiday.

Historically, together with Shavuot ("Pentecost") and Sukkot ("Tabernacles"), Passover is one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals (Shalosh Regalim) during which the entire population of the kingdom of Judah made a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. Samaritans still make this pilgrimage to Mount Gerizim, but only men participate in public worship.

"The Ten Commandments" by Cecil B. Demille
The life of Moses (Charlton Heston) is portrayed in this 1956 blockbuster film. Once favored in the Pharaoh's household (Yul Brynner), Moses turned his back on a privileged life to lead his people to freedom. Also starring Anne Baxter, Edward G. Robinson and Yvonne de Carlo.
CLICK HERE

 

 
 

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Hancock, MI 49930

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