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April 2019

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1

 

April Fools' Day

 

2

 

National Peanut Butter & Jelly Day

 

3

 
 
 

4

 

National Burrito Day [RECIPES]

 

5

 
 
 

6

 

National Tartan Day [BONUS: VENISON RECIPE]

 

7

 

National Beer Day

National Coffee Cake Day

 

8

 

National Empanada Day [RECIPES]

 

9

 
 
 

10

 

National Siblings Day

 

11

 

2019 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Frozen Four

National Pet Day

 

12

 

NATIONAL GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH DAY [Bonus Recipes Included]

 

13

 

Spring Wine Tasting

2019 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Championship

 

14

 

Palm Sunday

 

15

 

Tax Filing Deadline

 

16

 

Day of the Mushroom [BONUS: VEGAN RECIPES]

 

17

 
 
 

18

 

Annual Meeting

 

19

 

Passover [April 19 to April 27]

Good Friday

GARLIC DAY

 

20

 
 
 

21

 

Easter

 

22

 

EARTH DAY 2018

 

23

 
 
 

24

 
 
 

25

 
 
 

26

 
 
 

27

 

Arbor Day

 

28

 
 
 

29

 
 
 

30

 

International JAZZ Day

 
    

April 27, 2019

Arbor Day

Arbor Day (or Arbour; from the Latin arbor, meaning tree) is a holiday in which individuals and groups are encouraged to plant trees. Today, many countries observe such a holiday. Though usually observed in the spring, the date varies, depending on climate and suitable planting season.

First Arbor Day in the world
The Spanish village of Mondonedo held the first documented arbor plantation festival in the world organized by its mayor in 1594. The place remains as Alameda de los Remedios and it is still planted with lime and horse-chestnut trees. A humble granite marker and a bronze plate recall the event. Additionally, the small Spanish village of Villanueva de la Sierra held the first modern Arbor Day, an initiative launched in 1805 by the local priest with the enthusiastic support of the entire population.

While Napoleon was ravaging Europe with his ambition in this village in the Sierra de Gata lived a priest, don Juan Abern Samtres, which, according to the chronicles, "convinced of the importance of trees for health, hygiene, decoration, nature, environment and customs, decides to plant trees and give a festive air. The festival began on Carnival Tuesday with the ringing of two bells of the church, and the Middle and the Big. After the Mass, and even coated with church ornaments, don Juan, accompanied by clergies, teachers and a large number of neighbours, planted the first tree, a poplar, in the place known as Valley of the Ejido. Tree plantations continued by Arroyada and Fuente de la Mora. Afterwards, there was a feast, and did not miss the dance. The party and plantations lasted three days. He drafted a manifesto in defence of the trees that was sent to surrounding towns to spread the love and respect for nature, and also he advised to make tree plantations in their localities.

First American Arbor Day

Birdsey Northrop
The first American Arbor Day was originated in Nebraska City, Nebraska, U.S., by J. Sterling Morton. On April 10, 1872, an estimated one million trees were planted in Nebraska.

Birdsey Northrop of Connecticut was responsible for globalizing it when he visited Japan in 1883 and delivered his Arbor Day and Village Improvement message. In that same year, the American Forestry Association made Northrop the Chairman of the committee to campaign for Arbor Day nationwide. He also brought his enthusiasm for Arbor Day to Australia, Canada, and Europe.

McCreight and Theodore Roosevelt
Beginning in 1906, Pennsylvania conservationist Major Israel McCreight of DuBois, Pennsylvania, argued that President Theodore Roosevelt's conservation speeches were limited to businessmen in the lumber industry and recommended a campaign of youth education and a national policy on conservation education. McCreight urged President Roosevelt to make a public statement to school children about trees and the destruction of American forests. Conservationist Gifford Pinchot, Chief of the United States Forest Service, embraced McCreight's recommendations and asked the President to speak to the public school children of the United States about conservation. On April 15, 1907, Roosevelt issued an "Arbor Day Proclamation to the School Children of the United States" about the importance of trees and that forestry deserves to be taught in U.S. schools. Pinchot wrote McCreight, "we shall all be indebted to you for having made the suggestion."

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