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Calendar

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1

 

National Olive Day

 

2

 
 
 

3

 
 
 

4

 

National Cheese Day

 

5

 

National Veggie Burger Day

International Environment Day

 

6

 

D-Day

 

7

 

National Doughnut Day

National Chocolate Ice Cream Day

 

8

 

Best Friends Day

World Oceans Day

 

9

 
 
 

10

 

National Herbs and Spices Day

 

11

 

Corn on the Cob Day

 

12

 

National Rose Wine Day

National Jerky Day

National Peanut Butter Cookie Day

 

13

 
 
 

14

 

FLAG DAY

 

15

 
 
 

16

 

National Fudge Day

 

17

 

BridgeFEST

National Eat Your Vegetables Day

 

18

 

BridgeFEST

International PICNIC DAY (Recipes)

 

19

 

FATHER's DAY

BridgeFEST

Juneteenth

 

20

 

POLINATOR WEEK (June 20th - 26th)

 

21

 

First Day of Summer

 

22

 
 
 

23

 

National Hydration Day

 

24

 
 
 

25

 
 
 

26

 
 
 

27

 

National Onion Day

 

28

 
 
 

29

 
 
 

30

 
 
 
  

June 19, 2022

Juneteenth

Juneteenth, also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day, is an American holiday that commemorates the June 19, 1865, announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. state of Texas, and more generally the emancipation of enslaved African Americans throughout the former Confederate States of America. Its name is a portmanteau of "June" and "nineteenth", the date of its celebration. Juneteenth is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance in 45 states.

Observance is primarily in local celebrations. Traditions include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional songs such as "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" and "Lift Every Voice and Sing", and reading of works by noted African-American writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. Celebrations include rodeos, street fairs, cookouts, family reunions, park parties, historical reenactments, or Miss Juneteenth contests. The Mascogos, descendants of Black Seminoles, of Coahuila, Mexico also celebrate Juneteenth.

In 1980, Texas was the first state to establish Juneteenth as a state holiday under legislation introduced by freshman Democratic state representative Al Edwards. Juneteenth is a "partial staffing" holiday in Texas; government offices do not close but agencies may operate with reduced staff, and employees may either celebrate this holiday or substitute it with one of four "optional holidays" recognized by Texas.

By 2008, nearly half of US states observed the holiday as a ceremonial observance. As of 2014, 43 of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have recognized Juneteenth as either a state holiday or ceremonial holiday, a day of observance. States that do not recognize it are Hawaii, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota.

In 1996 the first legislation to recognize "Juneteenth Independence Day" was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives, H.J. Res. 195, sponsored by Barbara-Rose Collins (D-MI). In 1997 Congress recognized the day through Senate Joint Resolution 11 and House Joint Resolution 56. In 2013 the U.S. Senate passed Senate Resolution 175, acknowledging Lula Briggs Galloway (late president of the National Association of Juneteenth Lineage) who "successfully worked to bring national recognition to Juneteenth Independence Day", and the continued leadership of the National Juneteenth Observance Foundation. In 2018 Apple added Juneteenth to its calendars in iOS under official US holidays.

Organizations such as the National Juneteenth Observance Foundation are seeking a Congressional designation of Juneteenth as a national day of observance.

For more information on Juneteenth and the State of Michigan ...
CLICK HERE

 

 
 

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Hancock, MI 49930

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