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Calendar

PREV MONTH

November 2022

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Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
  

1

 

All Saints' Day

 

2

 

All Souls Day

Day of the Dead

 

3

 

National Sandwich Day (RECIPES)

 

4

 

41 North Film Festival (November 4 - 7)

 

5

 

41 North Film Festival (November 4 - 7)

 

6

 

Daylight Saving Time Ends

41 North Film Festival (November 4 - 7)

 

7

 

41 North Film Festival (November 4 - 7)

 

8

 

2022 Election Day

National Cappuccino Day

 

9

 

National Greek Yogurt Day (RECIPES)

 

10

 

National Vanilla Cupcake Day (RECIPES) BONUS Magnolia Cupcake RECIPE/VIDEO

 

11

 

Veteran's Day

 

12

 
 
 

13

 

World Kindness Day

 

14

 

National Pickle Day

World Diabetes Day

 

15

 

America Recycles Day

 

16

 

International Day for Tolerance

 

17

 

National Homemade Bread Day

International Student's Day

 

18

 
 
 

19

 

International Men's Day

 

20

 

Universal Children's Day

NATIONAL ABSURDITY DAY

 

21

 

Great American Smokeout

World Television Day

 

22

 
 
 

23

 

National Eat a Cranberry Day (RECIPES)

 

24

 

Thanksgiving Day (Co-op is Closed)

Little Brothers: Friends of the Elderly FREE Thanksgiving Dinners

Turkey Trot

National Sardines Day

 

25

 

Black Friday

Hancock Christmas Walk

 

26

 

Small Business Saturday (Tips & Hints)

 

27

 

Advent Season Begins

 

28

 

National French Toast Day (RECIPES)

Cyber Monday

 

29

 

National Lemon Cream Pie Day (RECIPE)

Giving Tuesday

 

30

 
 
 
   

November 2, 2022

Day of the Dead

The Day of the Dead (Spanish: Dia de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican heritage elsewhere. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

The holiday is sometimes called Dia de los Muertos in Anglophone countries, a back-translation of its original name, Dia de Muertos. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a public holiday. Prior to Spanish colonization in the 16th century, the celebration took place at the beginning of summer. Gradually, it was associated with October 31, November 1, and November 2 to coincide with the Western Christianity triduum of Allhallowtide: All Saints' Eve, All Saints' Day, and All Souls' Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using calaveras, aztec marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. Visitors also leave possessions of the deceased at the graves.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world, being absorbed into other deep traditions in honor of the dead. It has become a national symbol and as such is taught (for educational purposes) in the nation's schools. Many families celebrate a traditional "All Saints' Day" associated with the Catholic Church.

Originally, the Day of the Dead as such was not celebrated in northern Mexico, where it was unknown until the 20th century because its indigenous people had different traditions. The people and the church rejected it as a day related to syncretizing pagan elements with Catholic Christianity. They held the traditional 'All Saints' Day' in the same way as other Christians in the world. There was limited Mesoamerican influence in this region, and relatively few indigenous inhabitants from the regions of Southern Mexico, where the holiday was celebrated. In the early 21st century in northern Mexico, Dia de Muertos is observed because the Mexican government made it a national holiday based on educational policies from the 1960s; it has introduced this holiday as a unifying national tradition based on indigenous traditions.

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration is similar to other societies' observances of a time to honor the dead. The Spanish tradition, for instance, includes festivals and parades, as well as gatherings of families at cemeteries to pray for their deceased loved ones at the end of the day.

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Hancock, MI 49930

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